When I went to the airport last Saturday, I had thoughts of a week in Barbados with my wife and some family and friends, but I hadn't been on a plane in 18 years. Things didn't work out as I planned.

My fear of flying was much deeper that I realized. I had prepared for the flight. I reached out for counseling and spoke with my doctor about some medication that would make the trip possible.

I even was asked to test the medication prior to the flight and it worked well. So, when I got to the airport, I was nervous, but confident things would go well. Little did I know how deep my fear was, and that level of fear was basically stronger than the medication when it came to actually getting on board.

All I felt as the plane began to board was this overwhelming, paralyzing fear. I turned to Diane and remember saying over and over again, "I don't know what to do". Diane knew this was a possibility and, since family and friends were in Barbados already, the back-up plan was that she would go ahead with the trip, whether I could make it or not. I didn't get on the plane.

She left, and although I wanted nothing more than for her to have a great trip, you could imagine just how miserable I felt. I will say this, I know I've made a lot of progress. I got to the airport, ready to get on that plane, which is a huge deal, but for me it's just not that easy. But I'm not giving up. I never want to be in that situation again. I don't want to disappoint Diane, and I don't want to be unable to travel to places I want to be with her.

Over the next week or so on the show, we will have some advice, experts and conversations about overcoming this phobia. If you have this fear as well, you are certainly not alone. One in 10 Americans will not get on a plane. At some point, I'm hoping to lower that number.