This week's nor'easter isn't expected to be nearly as powerful as Sandy, however emergency management officials see it as vital in preparing them for any future storms that will be deadlier.

Storm-Damaged Communities On East Coast Hit By Nor'Easter (Mario Tama, Getty Images)

Ed Conover, deputy coordinator for the Atlantic County Office of Emergency Management, said the storm will be a good gauge for their level of preparedness.

"We're going to get a good preview of what could happen if we get more storms or worse storm later in the season."

Conover said mild flooding is a possibility as one to three inches of rain and a higher than normal tide is expected for several days. He said while dunes and other protective measures did their job during Sandy, some infrastructure remains weakened, so they're paying extra attention to this storm.

"Three or four years ago this storm this would have been less significant."

Ocean County Office of Emergency Management Sgt. Craig Johnson said they've already spoken with local officials, and that they are used to storms like this.

"We're pretty prone to nor'easters and our county is tested and our shelters are tested. That's why we actually did so well during Sandy."

Johnson said they'll be monitoring all aspects during the storm, however he is confident the dune system will remain in tact.