Fewer people have been on the road due to the pandemic (whether it's from the "stay at home" order, or people working from home, or no one going on random road trips, or no one taking family vacations). I remember one of the early "silver linings" was that maybe some of our roads would get fixed up, because there would be less traffic to divert. Obviously when construction projects were halted that idea was squashed, so we're still all driving on some bad roads.

CoPilotSearch.com did the research to find the worst roads in America, and unsurprisingly, New Jersey was one of the three worst states in the country. It's not just necessarily saying "hey, these roads are bad", instead they looked at the percentage of roads that were in poor condition. According to their study, 42.4 percent of urban roads in New Jersey fall into that "poor" category.

They also highlighted a few specific cities (and surrounding areas) and New Jersey popped up twice in the Top 15.

13. Philadelphia, PA–NJ–DE–MD

  • Percentage of all major roads in poor condition: 37.7%
  • Interstates & freeways in poor condition: 8.7%
  • Arterials in poor condition: 37.8%
  • Minor arterials in poor condition: 46.2%
  • Daily vehicle-miles per capita: 20.0
  • Miles of road per 1k people: 3.9

4. New York–Newark, NY–NJ–CT

  • Percentage of all major roads in poor condition: 45.5%
  • Interstates & freeways in poor condition: 18.7%
  • Arterials in poor condition: 53.2%
  • Minor arterials in poor condition: 48.3%
  • Daily vehicle-miles per capita: 16.0
  • Miles of road per 1k people: 2.4

Well, those are pretty obvious. Major cities are more notorious for bad roads, so Philadelphia and New York and Newark would definitely make the list. I'm sure if they broke things down into some smaller towns, Lakewood would be near the top.

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