A Toms River man has been indicted on two counts of murder, in connection with the deaths of two other Ocean County residents in December, the county prosecutor's office announced on Friday.

Tyshaun Drummond, 39, was indicted by a grand jury on two counts of murder, as well as charges of burglary and possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose.

At approximately 7:20 a.m. on Dec. 19, officers responded to a report of shots fired at an apartment complex on River Avenue in Lakewood. With a description from police dispatch of who allegedly fired the shots, officers located Drummond in front of the apartment complex. He refused to comply with officers' orders, and was then tasered and arrested, according to officials.

Inside the apartment building, officers discovered the dead bodies of Nicholas Hardy, 36, of Toms River, and Sergio Chavez-Perez, 32, of Lakewood. According to police, both men were shot in the head.

A subsequent investigation identified Drummond as the person responsible for the victims' deaths, the prosecutor's office said. He's been lodged in Ocean County Jail since his release from a local hospital on Dec. 21.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com

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BEEP BEEP BEEP: These are the 13 types of Wireless Emergency Alerts auto-pushed to your phone

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BEEP BEEP BEEP: These are the 13 types of Wireless Emergency Alerts auto-pushed to your phone

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