New Jersey could become a temporary home to thousands of refugees fleeing Ukraine.

Gov. Phil Murphy sent a letter to President Joe Biden saying the Garden State stands ready to help.

The U.N. refugee agency says 1 million people have fled Ukraine since Russia invaded the country a week ago, setting off the swiftest exodus of refugees this century.

In his letter, Murphy noted that New Jersey is already home to 75,000 residents of Ukrainian descent. New Jersey, he said, extends "a warm and sincere welcome to Ukrainians displaced by this senseless invasion."

Many of the refugees are women and children. All men between 18 and 60 have been conscripted to fight the Russian invasion.

It is not clear if the Biden administration will announce a coordinated effort to evacuate those displaced by the war, or if the U.S. will stage a coordinated evacuation effort.

Nearly 10,000 refugees from Afghanistan were flown to Joint Base Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst last year after U.S. troops pulled out and the Taliban took control. The last of those refugees were resettled last month, and their temporary housing torn down.

While offering to house Ukrainian refugees, Murphy also announced a new executive order that requires all state agencies to halt any actions that might support the Russian government.

In a statement, Murphy said, "Our Administration will immediately undertake a review of what we can do on the state level to increase financial pressure on the undemocratic regime in Moscow and to cut any state ties to the Russian government or its affiliated companies."

Eric Scott is the senior political director and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at eric.scott@townsquaremedia.com

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