You know you're from New Jersey when you can talk about accumulating snowfall and temperatures in the 60's in the same forecast.

A steamy sunrise over the Jersey Shore (Photo: Bud McCormick)
A steamy sunrise over the Jersey Shore (Photo: Bud McCormick)
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You know what grandma says. If those temperatures keep going up and down, you're going to catch a cold. And nobody wants to be coughing in public these days.

Here's the good news. We are on the "60's" portion of the swinging New Jersey pendulum of weather now. And that means unseasonably high temperatures for us.

Photo by Jarosław Kwoczała on Unsplash
Photo by Jarosław Kwoczała on Unsplash
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Unseasonably high? Yes. Record-breaking highs. Probably not. It turns out we've had some pretty impressive days of February warmth in Monmouth County in the past.

For example, according to the Office Of The State Climatologist, the record high for today (2/17) at the Freehold weather station was 67 degrees in 1976, and the mercury reached the same number the following day, to set records two days in a row.

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Google Maps
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In Long Branch, February 17th was a record-breaker in 2017, hitting 68 degrees And the record on the 18th is 67 degrees set on that 1976 day we talked about in Freehold.

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Google Maps
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Our Chief Meteorologist Dan Zarrow is calling for highs both today to hit 61 degrees and tomorrow, the morning starts in the low 50's and then drops to the 40's by afternoon.

So there is very little chance we'll get a record today, and just about zero chance we'll get one tomorrow. But that doesn't mean we won't enjoy a break from the bitter cold.

But enjoy it while you can. Before you can even find your flip-flops, we'll be back in the 40's for daytime highs this weekend. And that wind will be whipping up tonight, too.

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