We're all dreaming of a White Christmas this time of year, so snow is on our mind, and in our songs, and in our decorations, but a White Christmas isn't really in our forecast for this year. So, we'll have to put our snow gear aside once again this holiday. But if you are a snow lover, you know it will get here eventually. Let's take a look at last year's snowfalls in Monmouth and Ocean Counties.

These are the snowfalls that are recorded at the Office of the New Jersey State Climatologist for Winter 2020-2021 in Monmouth and Ocean Counties...

Photo by Stanley Dai on Unsplash
Photo by Stanley Dai on Unsplash
loading...

12/16-12/17. Monmouth County saw anywhere from a dusting to up to almost 8 inches in Freehold. That's a lot of snow for mid-December.

1/31-2/3. This was a big few days of snow. Top totals in Monmouth County Were Union Beach's 16 inches, with Colts Neck not far behind at nearly 14. Aberdeen and Freehold had 13 inches each.

2/7. We got hit with more snow just a few days later, and even though it wasn't as bad, Holmdel, Matawan, and Wall all clocked in at around 7 inches, and  Freehold and Englishtown got around 6 inches.

Photo by Andrey Bond on Unsplash
Photo by Andrey Bond on Unsplash
loading...

2/10-2/11. The snow kept coming with more accumulations in Monmouth County just a few days later. This storm brought about 2 inches to the area, with Freehold topping the totals at 3 inches.

2/18-2/19. We got hit again one week later with another big one. Colts Neck and Freehold once again led the way with over 9 inches each, with Manalapan and Red Bank not far behind.

2/22. Just a tenth of an inch of snow in Howell was the only thing that got Monmouth County on the board for this minor event.

Photo by Myriam Zilles on Unsplash
Photo by Myriam Zilles on Unsplash
loading...

So, we definitely had our share of snow last winter, not surprisingly, inland towns taking the brunt of it, and if you believe the Old Farmer's Almanac, we're in for a colder and snowier winter than usual this winter. Great.

For the record, we are expecting temperatures over 50 degrees on Christmas Day, so while it might be a wet Christmas, it most likely won't be a white one.

We Should't Complain About A Little Snow: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

TIPS: Here's how you can prepare for power outages

KEEP READING: Get answers to 51 of the most frequently asked weather questions...